June 29, 2017

Archives for May 2014

Google Spain and the “Right to Be Forgotten”

The European Court of Justice (CJEU) has decided the Google Spain case, which involves the “right to be forgotten” on the Internet. The case was brought by Mario Costeja González, a lawyer who, back in 1998, had unpaid debts that resulted in the attachment and public auction of his real estate. Notices of the auctions, including Mr. Costeja’s name, were published in a Spanish newspaper that was later made available online. Google indexed the newspaper’s website, and links to pages containing the announcements appeared in search results when Mr. Costeja’s name was queried. After failing in his effort to have the newspaper publisher remove the announcements from its website, Mr. Costeja asked Google not to return search results relating to the auction. Google refused, and Mr. Costeja filed a complaint with Spanish data protection authorities, the AEPD. In 2010, the AEPD ordered Google to de-index the pages. In the same ruling, the AEPD declined to order the newspaper publisher to take any action concerning the primary content, because the publication of the information by the press was legally justified. In other words, it was legal in the AEPD’s view for the newspaper to publish the information but a violation of privacy law for Google to help people find it. Google appealed the AEPD’s decision, and the appeal was referred by the Spanish court to the CJEU for a decision on whether Google’s publication of the search results violates the EU Data Protection Directive.
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Will Greenwald's New Book Reveal How to Conduct Warrantless Bulk Surveillance on Americans from Abroad?

Tomorrow, Glenn Greenwald’s highly anticipated book ‘No Place to Hide’ goes on sale. Apart from personal accounts on working with whisteblower Edward Snowden in Hong Kong and elsewhere, Mr. Greenwald announced that he will reveal new surveillance operations by Western intelligence agencies. In the last weeks, Sharon Goldberg and I have been finishing a paper on Executive Order 12333 (“EO 12333”). We argue that EO 12333 creates legal loopholes for U.S. authorities to circumvent the U.S. Constitution and conduct largely unchecked and unrestrained bulk surveillance of American communications from abroad. In addition, we present several known and new technical means to exploit those legal loopholes. Today, we publish a summary of our new paper in this post.

We stress that we’re not in a position to suggest that U.S. authorities are actually structurally circumventing the Constitution using the international loophole we discuss in the paper.  But, we’re wondering: will the gist of our analysis be part of Greenwald’s new revelations tomorrow? A first snippet of Greenwald’s new book in The Guardian, about hacking American routers destined for use overseas, seems to point in that direction. Here’s our summary. [Read more…]

The importance of anonymous cryptocurrencies

Recently I was part of a collaboration on Mixcoin, a set of proposals for improving Bitcoin’s anonymity. A natural question to ask is: why do this research? Before I address that, an even more basic question is whether or not Bitcoin is already anonymous. You may have seen back-and-forth arguments on this question. So which is it?

An analogy with Internet anonymity is useful. The Bitcoin protocol doesn’t require users to provide identities, just like the Internet Protocol doesn’t. This is what people usually mean when they say Bitcoin is anonymous. But that statement by itself tells us little. A meaningful answer cannot be found at the protocol level, but by analyzing the ecosystem of services that develop around the protocol. [*]

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