June 29, 2017

Archives for April 2015

Scan This or Scan Me? User Privacy & Barcode-Scanning Applications

[Please welcome guest bloggers Eric Smith and Nina Kollars. Eric Smith serves as the Chief Information Security Officer (CISO) for a higher ed consortium with membership consisting of Bucknell University, Franklin & Marshall College and Susquehanna University. Nina Kollars is assistant professor of government at Franklin & Marshall college, where her scholarship examines the ways in which individual user creativity affects the development of technology and practices.]

QR (Quick Response) codes—the two-dimensional barcodes designed by the Denso Wave company in 1994—were originally intended to track and inventory millions of parts on assembly lines. Since then, these nearly ubiquitous black and white squares have been applied to an ever-broader range of uses including business cards, patient-tracking systems, and mobile coupon clipping. In order to make use of these codes, the vast majority of consumers utilize smart phone technologies in order to convert the codes into usable information. However, neither Apple’s iOS nor Google’s Android operating systems include a robust native capability to scan and decode printed barcodes. As a result, users of these devices must download third-party applications that will do this work for them.

Research Question and Findings:

Our research question was straightforward: are there privacy and security risks associated with this emerging QR app ecosystem? In an attempt to answer this, we installed and analyzed over twenty of the most popular QR code applications. Our findings suggest that a majority of the most popular QR code readers found in the Apple App and Google Play marketplaces are not passive systems of information routing, but instead capture and transmit additional data about the device and the user back to the application developer. (For full details see our paper.)

Our findings reveal that many smartphone barcode scanning applications represent a significant threat to the privacy and, potentially, security of their users. On both platforms studied, the most popular QR code scanning apps, according to search result rankings were shown to transmit the contents of all scanned QR codes, as well as GPS location data, to a third-party server.
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Where is Internet Congestion Occurring?

In my post last week, I explained how Netflix traffic was experiencing congestion along end-to-end paths to broadband Internet subscribers, and how the resulting congestion was slowing down traffic to many Internet destinations. Although Netflix and Comcast ultimately mitigated this particular congestion episode by connecting directly to one another in a contractual arrangement known as paid peering, several mysteries about the congestion in this episode and other congestion episodes that persist. In the congestion episodes between Netflix and Comcast in 2014, perhaps the biggest question concerns where the congestion was actually taking place. There are several theories about where congestion was occurring; one or more of them are likely the case. I’ll dissect these cases in a bit more detail, and then talk more generally about some of the difficulties with locating congestion in today’s Internet, and why there’s still work for us to do to shed more light on these mysteries.
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