October 22, 2017

Web Census Notebook: A new tool for studying web privacy

As part of the Web Transparency and Accountability Project, we’ve been visiting the web’s top 1 million sites every month using our open-source privacy measurement tool OpenWPM. This has led to numerous worrying findings such as the systematic abuse of newly introduced web features for fingerprinting, leading to better privacy tools and occasionally strong responses from browser vendors.

Enabling research is great — OpenWPM has led to 14 papers so far — but research is slow and requires expertise. To make our work more directly useful, today we’re announcing a new tool to study web privacy: a Jupyter notebook interface and a set of libraries to quickly answer most questions about web tracking by querying the the 500 GB of data we collect every month.

Jupyter notebook is an intuitive tool for data analysis using Python, and it’s what we use here internally for much of our own research. Notebooks are accessible with a simple web interface; yet the code, data, and memory persists on the server if you close the browser and return to it later (even from a different device). Notebooks combine code with visualizations, making them ideal for data exploration and analysis.

Who could benefit from this tool? We envision uses such as these:

  • Publishers could use our data to understand third-party tracking on their own websites.
  • Journalists could use our data to investigate and expose privacy-infringing practices.
  • Regulators and enforcement agencies could use our tool in investigations.
  • Creators of browser privacy tools could use our data to test their effectiveness.

Let’s look at an example that shows the feel of the interface. The code below computes the average number of embedded trackers on the top 100 websites in various categories such as “news” and “shopping”. It is intuitive and succinct. Without our interface, not only would the SQL version of this query be much more cumbersome, but it would require a ton of legwork and setup to even get to a point where you can write the query. Now you just need to point your browser at our notebook.

    for category, domains in census.first_parties.alexa_categories.items():
        avg = sum(1 for first_party in domains[:100]
                    for third_party in first_party.third_party_resources
                    if third_party.is_tracker) / 100
        print("Average number of trackers on %s sites: %.1f" % (category, avg))

The results confirm our finding that news sites have the most trackers, and adult sites the least. [1]

Here’s what happens behind the scenes:

  • census is a Python object that exposes all the relationships between websites and third parties as object attributes, hiding the messy details of the underlying database schema. Each first party is represented by a FirstParty object that gives access to each third-party resource (URI object) on the first party, and the ThirdParty that the URI belongs to. When the objects are accessed, they are instantiated automatically by querying the database.
  • census.first_parties is a container of FirstParty objects ordered by Alexa traffic rank, so you can easily analyze the top sites, or sites in the long tail, or specific sites. You can also easily slice the sites by category: in the example above, we iterate through each category of census.first_parties.alexa_categories.
  • There’s a fair bit of logic that goes into analyzing the crawl data which third parties are embedded on which websites, and cross-referencing that with tracking-protection lists to figure out which of those are trackers. This work is already done for you, and exposed via attributes such as ThirdParty.is_tracker.

Since the notebooks run on our server, we expect to be able to support only a limited number (a few dozen) at this point, so you need to apply for access. The tool is currently in beta as we smooth out rough edges and add features, but it is usable and useful. Of course, you’re welcome to run the notebook on your own server — the underlying crawl datasets are public, and we’ll release the code behind the notebooks soon. We hope you find this of use to you, and we welcome your feedback.

 

[1] The linked graph from our paper measures the number of distinct domains whereas the query above counts every instance of every tracker. The trends are the same in both cases, but the numbers are different. Here’s the output of the query:

 

Average number of third party trackers on computers sites: 41.0
Average number of third party trackers on regional sites: 68.8
Average number of third party trackers on recreation sites: 58.2
Average number of third party trackers on health sites: 38.4
Average number of third party trackers on news sites: 151.2
Average number of third party trackers on business sites: 55.0
Average number of third party trackers on kids_and_teens sites: 74.8
Average number of third party trackers on home sites: 94.5
Average number of third party trackers on arts sites: 108.6
Average number of third party trackers on sports sites: 86.6
Average number of third party trackers on reference sites: 43.8
Average number of third party trackers on science sites: 43.1
Average number of third party trackers on society sites: 73.5
Average number of third party trackers on shopping sites: 53.1
Average number of third party trackers on adult sites: 16.8
Average number of third party trackers on games sites: 70.5