December 15, 2017

Archives for November 2017

CITP Call for Visitors and Affiliates 2018-19

The Center for Information Technology Policy is an interdisciplinary research center at Princeton that sits at the crossroads of engineering, the social sciences, law, and policy.

We are seeking applicants for various residential visiting positions and for non-residential affiliates. For more information about these positions, please see our general information page and yearly call for applications and our lists of current and past visitors.

For all visitors, we are happy to hear from anyone working at the intersection of digital technology and public life, including experts in computer science, sociology, economics, law, political science, public policy, information studies, communication, and other related disciplines.

We have a particular interest this year in candidates working on issues related to Artificial Intelligence (AI) and the Internet of Things (IoT).

Visitors

All visitors must apply online through the links below. There are three job postings for CITP visitors: 1) the Microsoft Visiting Research Scholar/Professor of Information Technology Policy, 2) Visiting IT Policy Fellow, and 3) IT Policy Researcher.

Microsoft Visiting Research Scholar/Professor of Information Technology Policy

The successful applicant must possess a Ph.D. and will be appointed to a ten-month term, beginning September 1st. The visiting professor must teach one course in technology policy per academic year. Preference will be given to current or past professors in related fields and to nationally or internationally recognized experts in technology policy.

The application process for the Microsoft Visiting Research Scholar/Professor of Information Technology Policy position is generally open from November through the end of January for the upcoming year.

Apply here to become the Microsoft Visiting Research Scholar/Visiting Professor of Information Technology Policy

Visiting IT Policy Fellow

A Visiting IT Policy Fellow is on leave from a full-time position (for example, a professor on sabbatical). The successful applicant must possess an advanced degree and typically will be appointed to a nine-month term, beginning September 1st.

Full consideration for the Visiting IT Policy Fellow is given to those who apply from November through the end of January for the upcoming year.

Apply here to become a Visiting IT Policy Fellow

IT Policy Researcher

An IT Policy Researcher will have Princeton University as the primary affiliation during the visit to CITP (for example, a postdoctoral researcher or a professional visiting for a year between jobs). The successful applicant must possess a Ph.D. or equivalent and typically will be appointed to a 12-month term, beginning September 1st.

Full consideration for IT Policy Researcher positions is given to those who apply from November through the end of January for the upcoming year.

Apply here to become an IT Policy Researcher

Applicants should apply to either the Visiting IT Policy Fellow position or the IT Policy Researcher position, but not both; applicants to either position may also apply to be the Microsoft Visiting Research Scholar/Professor if they hold a Ph.D.

All applicants should submit a current curriculum vitae, a research plan (including a description of potential courses to be taught if applying for the visiting professor position), and a cover letter describing background, interest in the program, and any funding support for the visit. References are not required until finalists are notified. CITP has secured limited resources from a range of sources to support visitors. However, many of our visitors are on paid sabbatical from their own institutions or otherwise provide some or all of their own outside funding.

Princeton University is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to age, race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law.

All offers and appointments are subject to review and approval by the Dean of the Faculty.

Affiliates

Technology policy researchers and experts who wish to have an affiliation with CITP, but cannot be in residence in Princeton, may apply to become a CITP Affiliate. The affiliation typically will last for two years. Affiliates do not have any formal appointment at Princeton University.

Applicants should email applications to between November and the end of January for affiliations beginning the following academic year. Please send a current curriculum vitae and a cover letter describing background and interest in the program.

If you have any questions about any of these positions or the application process, please feel free to contact us at

AI and Policy Event in DC, December 8

Princeton’s Center for Information Technology Policy (CITP) recently launched an initiative on Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning, and Public Policy.  On Friday, December 8, 2017, we’ll be in Washington DC talking about AI and policy.

The event is at the National Press Club, at 12:15-2:15pm on Friday, December 8.  Lunch will be provided for those who register in advance.

The agenda includes:

  • Ed Felten, with a background briefing on AI and the AI policy landscape,
  • Arvind Narayanan on AI and fairness,
  • Olga Russakovsky on diversifying the AI workforce,
  • Chloe Bakalar on AI and ethics, and
  • Nick Feamster on AI and freedom of expression.

For those who can stay longer, we’ll have a roundtable discussion with the speakers, starting at 2:30.

 

 

No boundaries: Exfiltration of personal data by session-replay scripts

This is the first post in our “No Boundaries” series, in which we reveal how third-party scripts on websites have been extracting personal information in increasingly intrusive ways. [0]
by Steven Englehardt, Gunes Acar, and Arvind Narayanan

Update: we’ve released our data — the list of sites with session-replay scripts, and the sites where we’ve confirmed recording by third parties.

You may know that most websites have third-party analytics scripts that record which pages you visit and the searches you make.  But lately, more and more sites use “session replay” scripts. These scripts record your keystrokes, mouse movements, and scrolling behavior, along with the entire contents of the pages you visit, and send them to third-party servers. Unlike typical analytics services that provide aggregate statistics, these scripts are intended for the recording and playback of individual browsing sessions, as if someone is looking over your shoulder.

[Read more…]