January 16, 2017

CITP Call for Visitors and Affiliates for 2017-18

The Center for Information Technology Policy is an interdisciplinary research center at Princeton that sits at the crossroads of engineering, the social sciences, law, and policy.

We are seeking applicants for various residential visiting positions and for non-residential affiliates. For more information about these positions, please see our general information page and yearly call for applications and our lists of current and past visitors.

We are happy to hear from anyone working at the intersection of digital technology and public life, including experts in computer science, sociology, economics, law, political science, public policy, information studies, communication, and other related disciplines.

We have a particular interest this year in candidates working on issues related to Interconnection, the Internet of Things (IoT), and the ethics of big data and algorithms.

Visitors

All visitors must apply online through the Jobs at Princeton site. There are three job postings for CITP visitors: 1) the Microsoft Visiting Professor of Information Technology Policy, 2) Visiting IT Policy Fellow, and 3) IT Policy Researcher.

A Visiting IT Policy Fellow is on leave from a full-time position (for example, a professor on sabbatical); an IT Policy Researcher will have Princeton University as the primary affiliation during the visit to CITP (for example, a postdoctoral researcher or a professional visiting for a year between jobs). As such, applicants should apply to only one of the Visiting IT Policy Fellow position or the IT Policy Researcher position as appropriate; applicants to either position may also apply to be the Microsoft Visiting Professor.
For all visitors, we are happy to hear from anyone working at the intersection of digital technology and public life, including experts in computer science, sociology, economics, law, political science, public policy, information studies, communication, and other related disciplines.

Applicants should submit a current curriculum vitae, a research plan (including a description of potential courses to be taught if applying for the Visiting Professorship), and a cover letter describing background, interest in the program, and any funding support for the visit. CITP has secured limited resources from a range of sources to support visitors. However, many of our visitors are on paid sabbatical from their own institutions or otherwise provide some or all of their own outside funding.

Microsoft Visiting Professor of Information Technology Policy

The successful applicant must possess at least a bachelor’s degree and will be appointed to a ten-month term, beginning September 1st, with the possibility of renewal for a second year. The Visiting Professor must teach one course in technology policy per academic year. Preference will be given to current or past professors in related fields and to nationally or internationally recognized experts in technology policy.

The application process for the Microsoft Visiting Professor of Information Technology position is generally open from November through the end of January for the upcoming year.

To apply to become the Microsoft Visiting Professor, please go to Jobs at Princeton, click on “Search Open Positions,” and enter requisition number 1600994.

Visiting IT Policy Fellow; IT Policy Researcher

The successful applicant must possess an advanced degree and typically will be appointed to a nine- to twelve-month term, beginning September 1st. These visitors may teach a seminar if desired, subject to the approval of the Dean of the Faculty. We encourage candidates at all levels to apply.

As noted above, candidates should apply to either the Visiting IT Policy Fellow position (if they will be on leave from a full-time position) or the IT Policy Researcher position (if not). Please do not apply to both listings.

Full consideration for the Visiting IT Policy Fellow and IT Policy Researcher positions is given to those who apply from November through the end of January for the upcoming year.

To apply to become a Visiting IT Policy Fellow, please go to Jobs at Princeton, click on “Search Open Positions,” and enter requisition number 1600996.

To apply to become an IT Policy Researcher, enter requisition number 1600995.

Princeton University is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action employer and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to age, race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law.

All offers and appointments are subject to review and approval by the Dean of the Faculty.

Affiliates

Technology policy researchers and experts who wish to have an affiliation with CITP, but cannot be in residence in Princeton, may apply to become a CITP Affiliate. The affiliation typically will last for two years. Affiliates do not have any formal appointment at Princeton University.

Applicants should email applications to between November and the end of January for affiliations beginning the following academic year. Please send a current curriculum vitae and a cover letter describing background and interest in the program.

New Workshop on Technology and Consumer Protection

[Joe Calandrino is a veteran of Freedom to Tinker and CITP. As long time readers will remember,  he did his Ph.D. here, advised by Ed Felten. He recently joined the FTC as research director of OTech, the Office of Technology Research and Investigation. Today we have an exciting announcement. — Arvind Narayanan.]

Arvind Narayanan and I are thrilled to announce a new Workshop on Technology and Consumer Protection (ConPro ’17) to be co-hosted with the IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy (Oakland) in May 2017:

Advances in technology come with countless benefits for society, but these advances sometimes introduce new risks as well. Various characteristics of technology, including its increasing complexity, may present novel challenges in understanding its impact and addressing its risks. Regulatory agencies have broad jurisdiction to protect consumers against certain harmful practices (typically called “deceptive and unfair” practices in the United States), but sophisticated technical analysis may be necessary to assess practices, risks, and more. Moreover, consumer protection covers an incredibly broad range of issues, from substantiation of claims that a smartphone app provides advertised health benefits to the adequacy of practices for securing sensitive customer data.

The Workshop on Technology and Consumer Protection (ConPro ’17) will explore computer science topics with an impact on consumers. This workshop has a strong security and privacy slant, with an overall focus on ways in which computer science can prevent, detect, or address the potential for technology to deceive or unfairly harm consumers. Attendees will skew towards academic and industry researchers but will include researchers from government agencies with a consumer protection mission, including the Federal Trade Commission—the U.S. government’s primary consumer protection body. Research advances presented at the workshop may help improve the lives of consumers, and discussions at the event may help researchers understand how their work can best promote consumer welfare given laws and norms surrounding consumer protection.

We have an outstanding program committee representing an incredibly wide range of computer science disciplines—from security, privacy, and e-crime to usability and algorithmic fairness—and touching on fields across the social sciences. The workshop will be an opportunity for these different disciplinary perspectives to contribute to a shared goal. Our call for papers discusses relevant topics, and we encourage anyone conducting research in these areas to submit their work by the January 10 deadline.

Computer science research—and computer security research in particular—excels at advancing innovative technical strategies to mitigate potential negative effects of digital technologies on society, but measures beyond strictly technical fixes also exist to protect consumers. How can our research goals, methods, and tools best complement laws, regulations, and enforcement? We hope this workshop will provide an excellent opportunity for computer scientists to consider these questions and find even better ways for our field to serve society.

Privacy: A Personality, Not Property, Right

The European Court of Justice’s decision in Google v. Costeja González appears to compel search engines to remove links to certain impugned search results at the request of individual Europeans (and potentially others beyond Europe’s borders). What is more, Costeja may inadvertently and ironically have the effect of appointing American companies as private censors and arbiters of the European public interest.

Google and other private entities are therefore saddled incomprehensibly with the gargantuan task of determining how to “balance the need for transparency with the need to protect people’s identities,” and Costeja’s failure to provide adequate interpretive guidelines further leads to ad hoc approaches by these companies. In addition, transparency and accountability are notoriously difficult to cultivate when balancing delicate constitutional values, such as freedom of expression and privacy. Indeed, even the constitutional courts and policy makers who typically perform this balancing struggle with it—think of the controversy associated with so-called “judicial activism.” The difficulty skyrockets when the balancers are instead inexperienced and reticent corporate actors, who presumably lack the requisite public legitimacy for such matters, especially when dealing with foreign (non-U.S.) nationals.

The Costeja decision attempts to paper over the growing divergence between Anglo-American and continental approaches to privacy. Its poor results highlight internal normative contradictions within the continental tradition and illustrate the urgency of re-conceptualizing digital privacy in a more transystemically viable fashion. [Read more…]