March 30, 2017

Sign up now for the Bitcoin and cryptocurrency technologies online course

At Princeton I taught a course on Bitcoin and cryptocurrency technologies during the semester that just ended. Joe Bonneau unofficially co-taught it with me. Based on student feedback and what we accomplished in the course, it was extremely successful. Next week I’ll post videos of all the final project presentations.

The course was based on a series of video lectures. We’re now offering these lectures free to the public, online, together with homeworks, programming assignments, and a textbook. We’ve heard from computer science students at various institutions as well as the Bitcoin community about the need for structured educational materials, and we’re excited to fill this need.

We’re using Piazza as our platform. Here’s the course page. To sign up, please fill out this (very short) form.

The first several book chapters are already available. The course starts February 16, and we’ll start making the videos available closer to that date (you’ll need to sign up to watch the videos Edit: we’ve changed this policy; the lectures are also publicly available). Each week there will be a Google hangout with that week’s lecturer. We’ll also answer questions on Piazza.

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Educating Leaders who Tackle the Challenges of their Time; Lessons from the Past: Book Review: First Class, The Legacy of Dunbar, America's First Black Public High School

One of last year’s CITP lectures that is still fresh in my mind is Brad Smith’s talk on “Immigration, Education, and the Future of Computer Science in America.” In his presentation on developing a process for educating the next generation of computer scientists in U.S. high schools and colleges, Mr. Smith noted that in the state of New Jersey, where 8.8 million people live, only 874 students took the computer science AP exam, and of those, only 17 were African-American. In Alison Stewart’s excellent new book “First Class: The Legacy of Dunbar, America’s First Black Public High School,” Ms. Smith tells the story of one of the best and most important American high schools of the 20th century. In the first half of the 20th century, Dunbar High School, a public school located in Washington, DC, produced numerous leaders in medicine, science, education, law, politics and the military, including several from my family. With the end of segregation, the conditions that resulted in Dunbar’s creation ceased to exist. The question remains, however, as to how in diverse public education systems to develop leaders in the fields that are critical to the country’s economic and social progress.
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Computer science education done right: A rookie’s view from the front lines at Princeton

In many organizations that are leaders in their field, new inductees often report being awed when they start to comprehend how sophisticated the system is compared to what they’d assumed. Engineers joining Google, for example, seem to express that feeling about the company’s internal technical architecture. Princeton’s system for teaching large undergraduate CS classes has had precisely that effect on me.

I’m “teaching” COS 226 (Data Structures and Algorithms) together with Josh Hug this semester. I put that word in quotes because lecturing turns out to be a rather small, albeit highly visible part of the elaborate instructional system for these classes that’s been put in place and refined over many years. It involves nine different educational modes that students interact with and a six different types of instructional staff(!), each with a different set of roles. Let me break it down in terms of instructional staff responsibilities, which correspond roughly to learning modes.
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