April 24, 2017

Are you really anonymous online?

As you browse the internet, online advertisers track nearly every site you visit, amassing a trove of information on your habits and preferences. When you visit a news site, they might see you’re a fan of basketball, opera and mystery novels, and accordingly select ads tailored to your tastes. Advertisers use this information to create highly personalized experiences, but they typically don’t know exactly who you are. They observe only your digital trail, not your identity itself, and so you might feel that you’ve retained a degree of anonymity.

In new work with Ansh Shukla, Sharad Goel and Arvind Narayanan, we show that these anonymous web browsing records can in fact often be tied back to real-world identities. (Check out our demo, and see if we can figure out who you are.)

At a high level, our approach is based on a simple observation. Each person has a highly distinctive social network, comprised of family and friends from school, work, and various stages throughout one’s life. As a consequence, the set of links in your Facebook and Twitter feeds is likewise highly distinctive, and clicking on these links leaves a tell-tale mark in your browsing history.

Given only the set of web pages an individual has visited, we determine which social media feeds are most similar to it, yielding a list of candidate users who likely generated that web browsing history. In this manner, we can tie a person’s real-world identity to the near complete set of links they have visited, including links that were never posted on any social media site. This method requires only that one click on the links appearing in their social media feeds, not that they post any content.

Carrying out this strategy involves two key challenges, one theoretical and one engineering. The theoretical problem is quantifying how similar a specific social media feed is to a given web browsing history. One simple similarity measure is the fraction of links in the browsing history that also appear in the feed. This metric works reasonably well in practice, but it overstates similarity for large feeds, since those simply contain more links. We instead take an alternative approach. We posit a stylized, probabilistic model of web browsing behavior, and then compute the likelihood a user with that social media feed generated the observed browsing history. It turns out that this method is approximately equivalent to scaling the fraction of history links that appear in the feed by the log of the feed size.

The engineering challenge is identifying the most similar feeds in real time. Here we turn to Twitter, since Twitter feeds (in contrast to Facebook) are largely public. However, even though the feeds are public, we cannot simply create a local copy of Twitter against which we can run our queries. Instead we apply a series of heuristics to dramatically reduce the search space. We then combine caching techniques with on-demand network crawls to construct the feeds of the most promising candidates. On this reduced candidate set, we apply our similarity measure to produce the final results. Given a browsing history, we can typically carry out this entire process in under 60 seconds.

Our initial tests indicate that for people who regularly browse Twitter, we can deduce their identity from their web browsing history about 80% of the time. Try out our web application, and let us know if it works on you!

All the News That’s Fit to Change: Insights into a corpus of 2.5 million news headlines

[Thanks to Joel Reidenberg for encouraging this deeper dive into news headlines!]

There is no guarantee that a news headline you see online today will not change tomorrow, or even in the next hour, or will even be the same headlines your neighbor sees right now. For a real-life example of the type of change that can happen, consider this explosive headline from NBC News…

“Bernanke: More Execs Deserved Jail for Financial Crisis”

…contrasted with the much more subdued…

“Bernanke Thinks More Execs Should Have Been Investigated”

These headlines clearly suggest different stories, which is worrying because of the effect that headlines have on our perception of the news — a recent survey found that, “41 percent of Americans report that they watched, read, or heard any in-depth news stories, beyond the headlines, in the last week.”

As part of the Princeton Web Transparency and Accountability Project (WebTAP), we wanted to understand more about headlines. How often do news publishers change headlines on articles? Do variations offer different editorial slants on the same article? Are some variations ‘clickbait-y’?

To answer these questions we collected over ~1.5 million article links seen since June 1st, 2015 on 25 news sites’ front pages through the Internet Archive’s Wayback Machine. Some articles were linked to with more than one headline (at different times or on different parts of the page), so we ended up with a total of ~2.5 million headlines.[1] To clarify, we are defining headlines as the text linking to articles on the front page of news websites — we are not talking about headlines on the actual article pages themselves. Our corpus is available for download here. In this post we’ll share some preliminary research and outline further research questions.

 

One in four articles had more than one headline associated with it

We were limited in our analysis to how many snapshots of the news sites the Wayback Machine took. For the six months of data from 2015 especially, some of the less-popular news sites did not have as many daily snapshots as the more popular sites — the effect of this might suppress the measure of headline variation on less popular websites. Even so, we were able to capture many instances of articles with multiple headlines for each site we looked at.

 

Clickbait is common, and hasn’t changed much in the last year

We took a first pass at our data using an open source library to classify headlines as clickbait. The classifier was trained by the developer using Buzzfeed headlines as clickbait and New York Times headlines as non-clickbait, so it can more accurately be called a Buzzfeed classifier. Unsurprisingly then, Buzzfeed had the most clickbait headlines detected of the sites we looked at.

But we also discovered that more “traditional” news outlets regularly use clickbait headlines too. The Wall Street Journal, for instance, has used clickbait headlines in place of more traditional headlines for its news stories, as in two variations they tried for an article on the IRS:

‘Think Tax Time Is Tough? Try Being at the IRS’

vs.

‘Wait Times Are Down, But IRS Still Faces Challenges’

Overall, we found that at least 10% of headlines were classified as clickbait on a majority of sites we looked at. We also found that overall, clickbait does not appear to be any more or less common now than it was in June 2015.

 

Using lexicon-based heuristics we were able to identify many instances of bias in headlines

Identifying bias in headlines is a much harder problem than finding clickbait. One research group from Stanford approached detecting bias as a machine learning problem — they trained a classifier to recognize when Wikipedia edits did or did not reflect a neutral point of view, as identified by thousands of human Wikipedia editors. While Wikipedia edits and headlines differ in some pretty important ways, using their feature set was informative. They developed a lexicon of suspect words, curated from decades of research on biased language. Consider the use of the root word “accuse,” as in this example we found from Time Magazine:

‘Roger Ailes Resigns From Fox News’

vs.

‘Roger Ailes Resigns From Fox News Amid Sexual Harassment Accusations’

The first headline just offers the “who” and “what” of the news story — the second headline’s “accusations” add the much more attention-grabbing “why.” Some language use is more subtle, like in this example from Fox News:

‘DNC reportedly accuses Sanders campaign of improperly accessing Clinton voter data’

vs.

‘DNC reportedly punishes Sanders campaign for accessing Clinton voter data’

The facts implied by these headlines are different in a very important way. The second headline, unlike the first, can cause a reader presuppose that the Sanders campaign did do something wrong or malicious, since they are being punished. The first headline hedges the story significantly, only saying that the Sanders campaign may have done something “improper” — the truth of that proposition is not suggested. The researchers identify this as a bias of entailment.

Using a modified version of the biased-language lexicon, we looked at our own corpus of headlines and identified when headline variations added or dropped these biased words. We found approximately 3000 articles in which headline variations for the same article used different biased words, which you can look at here. From our data collection we clearly have evidence of editorial bias playing a role in the different headlines we see on news sites.

 

Detecting all instances of bias and avoiding false positives is an open research problem

While identifying bias in 3000 articles’ headlines is a start, we think we’ve identified only a fraction of biased articles. One reason for missing bias is that our heuristic defines differential bias narrowly (explicit use of biased words in one headline not present in another). There are also false positives in the headlines that we detected as biased. For instance, an allegation or an accusation might show a lack of neutrality in a Wikipedia article, but in a news story an allegation or accusation may simply be the story.

We know for sure that our data contains evidence of editorial and biased variations in headlines, but we still have a long way to go. We would like to be able to identify at scale and with high confidence when a news outlet experiments with its headlines. But there are many obstacles compared to the previous work on identifying bias in Wikipedia edits:

– Without clear guidelines, finding bias in headlines is a more subjective exercise than finding it in Wikipedia articles.

– Headlines are more information-dense than Wikipedia articles — fewer words in headlines contribute to a headline’s implication.

– Many of the stories that the news publishes are necessarily more political than most Wikipedia articles.

If you have any ideas on how to overcome these obstacles, we invite you to reach out to us or take a look at the data yourself, available for download here.

@dillonthehuman

[1] Our main measurements ignore subpages like nytimes.com/pages/politics, which appear to often have article links that are at some point featured on the front page. For each snapshot of the front page, we collected the links to articles seen on the page along with the ‘anchor text’ of those links, which are generally the headlines that are being varied.

Can Facebook really make ads unblockable?

[This is a joint post with Grant Storey, a Princeton undergraduate who is working with me on a tool to help users understand Facebook’s targeted advertising.]

Facebook announced two days ago that it would make its ads indistinguishable from regular posts, and hence impossible to block. But within hours, the developers of Adblock Plus released an update which enabled the tool to continue blocking Facebook ads. The ball is now back in Facebook’s court. So far, all it’s done is issue a rather petulant statement. The burning question is this: can Facebook really make ads indistinguishable from content? Who ultimately has the upper hand in the ad blocking wars?

There are two reasons — one technical, one legal — why we don’t think Facebook will succeed in making its ads unblockable, if a user really wants to block them.

The technical reason is that the web is an open platform. When you visit facebook.com, Facebook’s server sends your browser the page content along with instructions on how to render them on the screen, but it is entirely up to your browser to follow those instructions. The browser ultimately acts on behalf of the user, and gives you — through extensions — an extraordinary degree of control over its behavior, and in particular, over what gets displayed on the screen. This is what enables the ecosystem of ad-blocking and tracker-blocking extensions to exist, along with extensions for customizing web pages in various other interesting ways.

Indeed, the change that Adblock Plus made in order to block the new, supposedly unblockable ads is just a single line in the tool’s default blocklist:

facebook.com##div[id^="substream_"] div[id^="hyperfeed_story_id_"][data-xt]

What’s happening here is that Facebook’s HTML code for ads has slight differences from the code for regular posts, so that Facebook can keep things straight for its own internal purposes. But because of the open nature of the web, Facebook is forced to expose these differences to the browser and to extensions such as Adblock Plus. The line of code above allows Adblock Plus to distinguish the two categories by exploiting those differences.

Facebook engineers could try harder to obfuscate the differences. For example, they could use non-human-readable element IDs to make it harder to figure out what’s going on, or even randomize the IDs on every page load. We’re surprised they’re not already doing this, given the grandiose announcement of the company’s intent to bypass ad blockers. But there’s a limit to what Facebook can do. Ultimately, Facebook’s human users have to be able to tell ads apart, because failure to clearly distinguish ads from regular posts would run headlong into the Federal Trade Commission’s rules against misleading advertising — rules that the commission enforces vigorously. [1, 2] And that’s the second reason why we think Facebook is barking up the wrong tree.

Facebook does allow human users to easily recognize ads: currently, ads say “Sponsored” and have a drop-down with various ad-related functions, including a link to the Ad Preferences page. And that means someone could create an ad-blocking tool that looks at exactly the information that a human user would look at. Such a tool would be mostly immune to Facebook’s attempts to make the HTML code of ads and non-ads indistinguishable. Again, the open nature of the web means that blocking tools will always have the ability to scan posts for text suggestive of ads, links to Ad Preferences pages, and other markers.

But don’t take our word for it: take our code for it instead. We’ve created a prototype tool that detects Facebook ads without relying on hidden HTML code to distinguish them. [Update: the source code is here.] The extension examines each post in the user’s news feed and marks those with the “Sponsored” link as ads. This is a simple proof of concept, but the detection method could easily be made much more robust without incurring a performance penalty. Since our tool is for demonstration purposes, it doesn’t block ads but instead marks them as shown in the image below.  

All of this must be utterly obvious to the smart engineers at Facebook, so the whole “unblockable ads” PR push seems likely to be a big bluff. But why? One possibility is that it’s part of a plan to make ad blockers look like the bad guys. Hand in hand, the company seems to be making a good-faith effort to make ads more relevant and give users more control over them. Facebook also points out, correctly, that its ads don’t contain active code and aren’t delivered from third-party servers, and therefore aren’t as susceptible to malware.

Facebook does deserve kudos for trying to clean up and improve the ad experience. If there is any hope for a peaceful resolution to the ad blocking wars, it is that ads won’t be so annoying as to push people to install ad blockers, and will be actually useful at least some of the time. If anyone can pull this off, it is Facebook, with the depth of data it has about its users. But is Facebook’s move too little, too late? On most of the rest of the web, ads continue to be creepy malware-ridden performance hogs, which means people will continue to install ad blockers, and as long as it is technically feasible for ad blockers to block Facebook ads, they’re going to continue to do so. Let’s hope there’s a way out of this spiral.

[1] Obligatory disclaimer: we’re not lawyers.

[2] Facebook claims that Adblock Plus’s updates “don’t just block ads but also posts from friends and Pages”. What they’re most likely referring to that Adblock Plus blocks ads that are triggered by one of your friends Liking the advertiser’s page. But these are still ads: somebody paid for them to appear in your feed. Facebook is trying to blur the distinction in its press statement, but it can’t do that in its user interface, because that is exactly what the FTC prohibits.