August 23, 2016

Andrew Appel

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Security against Election Hacking – Part 2: Cyberoffense is not the best cyberdefense!

State and county election officials across the country employ thousands of computers in election administration, most of them are connected (from time to time) to the internet (or exchange data cartridges with machines that are connected).  In my previous post I explained how we must audit elections independently of the computers, so we can trust the results even if the computers are hacked.

Still, if state and county election computers were hacked, it would be an enormous headache and it would certainly cast a shadow on the legitimacy of the election.  So, should the DHS designate election computers as “critical cyber infrastructure?”

This question betrays a fundamental misunderstanding of how computer security really works.  You as an individual buy your computers and operating systems from reputable vendors (Apple, Microsoft, IBM, Google/Samsung, HP, Dell, etc.).  Businesses and banks (and the Democratic National Committee, and the Republican National Committee) buy their computers and software from the same vendors.  Your security, and the security of all the businesses you deal with, is improved when these hardware and software vendors build products without security bugs in them.   Election administrators use computers that run Windows (or MacOS, or Linux) bought from the same vendors.

Parts of the U.S. government, particularly inside the NSA, have “cyberdefense” teams that analyze widely used software for security vulnerabilities.  The best thing they could do to enhance our security is notify the vendors immediately about vulnerabilities, so the vendors can fix the bugs (and learn their lessons).   Unfortunately, the NSA also has “cyberoffense” teams that like to save up these vulnerabilities, keep them secret, and use them as weak points to break into their adversaries’ computers.  They think they’re so smart that the Russkies, or the Chinese, will never be able to figure out the same vulnerabilities and use them to break into the computers of American businesses, individuals, the DNC or RNC, or American election administrators.  There’s even an acronym for this fallacy: NOBUS.  “NObody But US” will be able to figure out this attack.

Vulnerability lists accumulated by the NSA and DHS probably don’t include a lot of vote-counting software: those lists (probably) focus on widely used operating systems, office and word-processing, network routers, phone apps, and so on.  But vote-counting software typically runs on widely used operating systems, uses PDF-handling software for ballot printing, network routers for vote aggregation.  Improvements in these components would improve election security.

So, the “cyberdefense” experts in the U.S. Government could improve everyone’s security, including election administrators, by promptly warning Microsoft, Apple, IBM, and so on about security bugs.  But their hands are often tied by the “cyberoffense” hackers who want to keep the bugs secret—and unfixed.  For years, independent cybersecurity experts have advocated that the NSA’s cyberdefense and cyberoffense teams be split up into two separate organizations, so that the offense hackers can’t deliberately keep us all insecure.   Unfortunately, in February 2016 the NSA did just the opposite: it merged its offense and defense teams together.

Some in the government talk as if “national cyberdefense” is some kind of “national guard” that they can send in to protect a selected set of computers.  But it doesn’t work that way.  Our computers are secure because of the software we purchase and install; we can choose vendors such as Apple, IBM, Microsoft, HP, or others based on their track record or based on their use of open-source software that we can inspect.  The DHS’s cybersecurity squad is not really in that process, except as they help the vendors improve the security of their products.  (See also:  “The vulnerabilities equities process.”)

Yes, it’s certainly helpful that the Secretary of Homeland Security has offered “assistance in helping state officials manage risks to voting systems in each state’s jurisdiction.”  But it’s too close to the election to be fiddling with the election software—election officials (understandably) don’t want to break anything.

But really we should ask: Should the FBI and the NSA be hacking us or defending us?  To defend us, they must stop hoarding secret vulnerabilities, and instead get those bugs fixed by the vendors.

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Security against Election Hacking – Part 1: Software Independence

There’s been a lot of discussion of whether the November 2016 U.S. election can be hacked.  Should the U.S. Government designate all the states’ and counties’ election computers as “critical cyber infrastructure” and prioritize the “cyberdefense” of these systems?  Will it make any difference to activate those buzzwords with less than 3 months until the election?

First, let me explain what can and can’t be hacked.  Election administrators use computers in (at least) three ways:

  1. To maintain voter registration databases and to prepare the “pollbooks” used at every polling place to list who’s a registered voter (for that precinct); to prepare the “ballot definitions” telling the voting machines who are the candidates in each race.
  2. Inside the voting machines themselves, the optical-scan counters or touch-screen machines that the voter interacts with directly.
  3. When the polls close, the vote totals from all the different precincts are gathered (this is called “canvassing”) and aggregated together to make statewide totals for each candidate (or district-wide totals for congressional candidates).

Any of these computers could be hacked.  What defenses do we have?  Could we seal off the internet so the Russians can’t hack us?  Clearly not; and anyway, maybe the hacker isn’t the Russians—what if it’s someone in your opponent’s political party?  What if it’s a rogue election administrator?

The best defenses are ways to audit the election and count the votes outside of, independent of the hackable computers.  For example,

[Read more…]

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Internet Voting? Really?

Recently I gave a TEDx talk—I spoke at the local Princeton University TEDx event.  My topic was voting: America’s voting systems in the 19th and 20th century, and should we vote using the Internet?  You can see the talk here:

 

Internet Voting? Really?

 

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Internet Voting, Utah GOP Primary Election

Utah’s Republican presidential primary was conducted today by Internet.  If you have your voter-registration PIN, or even if you don’t, visit https://ivotingcenter.gop and you will learn something about Internet voting!

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Apple/FBI: Freedom of speech vs. compulsion to sign

This week I signed the Electronic Frontier Foundation’s amicus (friend-of-the-court) brief in the Apple/FBI  iPhone-unlocking lawsuit.  Many prominent computer scientists and cryptographers signed: Josh Aas, Hal Abelson, Judy Anderson, Andrew Appel, Tom Ball (the Google one, not the Microsoft one), Boaz Barak, Brian Behlendorf, Rich Belgard, Dan Bernstein, Matt Bishop, Josh Bloch, Fred Brooks, Mark Davis, Jeff Dean, Peter Deutsch, David Dill, Les Earnest, Brendan Eich, David Farber, Joan Feigenbaum, Michael Fischer, Bryan Ford, Matt Franklin, Matt Green, Alex Halderman, Martin Hellman, Nadia Heninger, Miguel de Icaza, Tanja Lange, Ed Lazowska, George Ledin, Patrick McDaniel, David Patterson, Vern Paxson, Thomas Ristenpart, Ron Rivest, Phillip Rogaway, Greg Rose, Guido van Rossum, Tom Shrimpton, Barbara Simons, Gene Spafford, Dan Wallach, Nickolai Zeldovich, Yan Zhu, Phil Zimmerman. (See also the EFF’s blog post.)

The technical and legal argument is based on the First Amendment: (1) Computer programs are a form of speech; (2) the Government cannot compel you to “say” something any more than it can prohibit you from expressing something.  Also, (3) digital signatures are a form of signature; (4) the government cannot compel or coerce you to sign a statement that you don’t believe, a statement that is inconsistent with your values.  Each of these four statements has ample precedent in Federal law.  Combined together, (1) and (2) mean that Apple cannot be compelled to write a specific computer program.  (3) and (4) mean that even if the FBI wrote the program (instead of forcing Apple to write it), Apple could not be compelled to sign it with its secret signing key.  The brief argues,

By compelling Apple to write and then digitally sign new code, the Order forces Apple to first write a message to the government’s specifications, and then adopt, verify and endorse that message as its own, despite its strong disagreement with that message. The Court’s Order is thus akin to the government dictating a letter endorsing its preferred position and forcing Apple to transcribe it and sign its unique and forgery-proof name at the bottom.

[Read more…]

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Freedom to Tinker on the Radio

Today on the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation’s CBC Radio show, “The Current”, a 20-minute segment about the freedom to tinker:

“Arrested, for tinkering.  Young Ahmed Mohamed likes to take things apart, cross wires, experiment… and put things back together again. It’s the kind of hobby that once led to companies like…say, Apple and Microsoft. But is a security-centric culture interfering with the freedom to tinker?”

Radio host Piya Chattopadhyay interviews three panelists:

  • Lindy Wilkins, community technologist and the co-founder of Make Friends, a monthly meet-up of makers and community organizers in Toronto,
  • Alexandra Samuel, independent technology researcher in Vancouver who is working on a book about Tinkering and education for kids,
  • Andrew Appel, Professor of Computer Science at Princeton University and blogger at Freedom-to-Tinker.

When I was Ahmed’s age, back in 1973, I read this really cool article in Scientific American’s Amateur Scientist column, about how to use TTL integrated circuit components to make, for example, a clock.  So I went to Radio Shack to buy the parts, I learned how to use a soldering iron, and I built a clock.

Didn’t get arrested.  Was that because I was white, because I went to a school where the teachers had some sense, because it was before 9/11 and mass school shootings, or all of the above?

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A clear line between offense and defense

The New York Times, in an editorial today entitled “Arms Control for a Cyberage“, writes,

The problem is that unlike conventional weapons, with cyberweapons “there’s no clear line between offense and defense,” as President Obama noted this month in an interview with Re/code, a technology news publication. Defense in cyberwarfare consists of pre-emptively locating the enemy’s weakness, which means getting into its networks.

This is simply wrong.
[Read more…]

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Ed Felten elected to National Academy

The National Academy of Engineering announced today that Edward W. Felten, professor of computer science and public affairs, and director, Center for Information Technology Policy, Princeton University, Princeton, N.J., has been elected to the National Academy “For contributions to security of computer systems, and for impact on public policy.”

From the NAE’s announcement:

Election to the National Academy of Engineering is among the highest professional distinctions accorded to an engineer.  Academymembership honors those who have made outstanding contributions to “engineering research, practice, or education, including, where appropriate, significant contributions to the engineering literature,” and to the “pioneering of new and developing fields of technology, making major advancements in traditional fields of engineering, or developing/implementing innovative approaches to engineering education.”

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Oral arguments in NJ voting-machines lawsuit appeal

The appellate hearing (oral argument) of the New Jersey voting-machines lawsuit (Gusciora v. Christie) has been rescheduled to March 5, 2013 in Trenton, NJ.

To learn what this is all about, and why you should attend, click here.

To recheck the location, time of day, and date of the hearing before you go down to Trenton, check this very post for updates.

Note new time!

Time:  10:00 a.m. 11:30 a.m., March 5, 2013  (but arrive significantly earlier, because it takes some time to get through security).

Place:  8th Floor, N. Wing, Hughes Justice Complex, Trenton, NJ.   Specifically,  Part E: Judges Messano, Ostrer and Lihotz.

Transportation:  If anyone from the Princeton area is interested in carpooling, send me mail.

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Voting machine lawsuit, oral arguments, venue change

For those who were considering attending the oral arguments December 4th of the appeal of the Gusciora lawsuit about New Jersey’s voting machines–which I encourage you to do–the location has been changed from Jersey City to Trenton.

Location: 8th Floor, N. Wing, Hughes Justice Complex, Trenton, NJ.

Date/time: December 4th, 2012, 10:00 a.m.

Postponed until a date yet to be determined [note added 11/29/12].