August 29, 2016

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The Princeton Bitcoin textbook is now freely available

The first complete draft of the Princeton Bitcoin textbook is now freely available. We’re very happy with how the book turned out: it’s comprehensive, at over 300 pages, but has a conversational style that keeps it readable.

If you’re looking to truly understand how Bitcoin works at a technical level and have a basic familiarity with computer science and programming, this book is for you. Researchers and advanced students will find the book useful as well — starting around Chapter 5, most chapters have novel intellectual contributions.

Princeton University Press is publishing the official, peer-reviewed, polished, and professionally done version of this book. It will be out this summer. If you’d like to be notified when it comes out, you should sign up here.

Several courses have already used an earlier draft of the book in their classes, including Stanford’s CS 251. If you’re an instructor looking to use the book in your class, we welcome you to , and we’d be happy to share additional teaching materials with you.

Online course and supplementary materials. The Coursera course accompanying this book had 30,000 students in its first version, and it was a success based on engagement and end-of-course feedback. 

We plan to offer a version with some improvements shortly. Specifically, we’ll be integrating the programming assignments developed for the Stanford course with our own, with Dan Boneh’s gracious permission. We also have tenative plans to record a lecture on Ethereum (we’ve added a discussion of Ethereum to the book in Chapter 10).

Finally, graduate students at Princeton have been leading the charge on several exciting research projects in this space. Watch this blog or my Twitter for updates.

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Bitcoin course available on Coursera; textbook is now official

Earlier this year we made our online course on Bitcoin publicly available 11 video lectures and draft chapters of our textbook-in-progress, including exercises. The response has been very positive: numerous students have sent us thanks, comments, feedback, and a few error corrections. We’ve heard that our materials are being used in courses at a few universities. Some students have even translated the chapters to other languages.

Coursera. I’m very happy to announce that the course is now available as a Princeton University online course on Coursera. The first iteration starts next Friday, September 4. The Coursera version offers embedded quizzes to test your understanding; you’ll also be part of a community of students to discuss the lectures with (about 10,000 15,000 have already signed up). We’ve also fixed all the errors we found thanks to the video editing skillz of the Princeton Broadcast Center folks. Sign up now, it’s free!

We’re closely watching ongoing developments in the cryptocurrency world such as Ethereum. Whenever a body of scientific knowledge develops around a new area, we will record additional lectures. The Coursera class already includes one additional lecture: it’s on the history of cryptocurrencies by Jeremy Clark. Jeremy is the ideal person to give this lecture for many reasons, including the fact that he worked with David Chaum for many years.

Jeremy Clark lecturing on the history of cryptocurrencies

Textbook. We’re finishing the draft of the textbook; Chapter 8 was released today and the rest will be coming out in the next few weeks. The textbook closely follows the structure of the lectures, but the textual format has allowed us to refine and polish the explanations, making them much clearer in many places, in my opinion.

I’m excited to announce that we’ll be publishing the textbook with Princeton University Press. The draft chapters will continue to be available free of charge, but you should buy the book it will be peer reviewed, professionally edited and typeset, and the graphics will be re-done professionally.

Finally, if you’re an educator interested in teaching Bitcoin, write to us and we’ll be happy to share with you some educational materials that aren’t yet public.

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Computer science education done right: A rookie’s view from the front lines at Princeton

In many organizations that are leaders in their field, new inductees often report being awed when they start to comprehend how sophisticated the system is compared to what they’d assumed. Engineers joining Google, for example, seem to express that feeling about the company’s internal technical architecture. Princeton’s system for teaching large undergraduate CS classes has had precisely that effect on me.

I’m “teaching” COS 226 (Data Structures and Algorithms) together with Josh Hug this semester. I put that word in quotes because lecturing turns out to be a rather small, albeit highly visible part of the elaborate instructional system for these classes that’s been put in place and refined over many years. It involves nine different educational modes that students interact with and a six different types of instructional staff(!), each with a different set of roles. Let me break it down in terms of instructional staff responsibilities, which correspond roughly to learning modes.
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