April 19, 2015

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On compromising app developers to go after their users

In a recent article by Scahill and Begley, we learned that the CIA is interested in targeting Apple products. I largely agree with the quote from Steve Bellovin, that “spies gonna spy”, so of course they’re interested in targeting the platform that rides in the pockets of many of their intelligence collection targets. What could be a tastier platform for intelligence collection than a device with a microphone, cellular network connection, GPS, and a battery, which your targets willingly carry around in their pockets? Even better, your targets will spare you the trouble of recharging your spying device for you. Of course you target their iPhones! (And Androids. And Blackberries.)

To my mind, the real eyebrow raising moment was that the CIA is also allegedly targeting app developers through “whacking” Apple’s Xcode tool, presumably allowing all subsequent software shipped from the developer to the app store to contain some sort of malicious implant, which will then be distributed within that developer’s app. Nothing has been disclosed about how widespread these attacks are (if ever used at all), what developers might have been targeted, or how the implants might function.
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Threshold signatures for Bitcoin wallets are finally here

Today we are pleased to release our paper presenting a new ECDSA threshold signature scheme that is particularly well-suited for securing Bitcoin wallets. We teamed up with cryptographer Rosario Gennaro to build this scheme. Threshold signatures can be thought of as “stealth multi-signatures.” [Read more…]

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FREAK Attack: The Chickens of ‘90s Crypto Restriction Come Home to Roost

Today researchers disclosed a new security flaw in TLS/SSL, the protocol used to secure web connections. The flaw is significant in itself, but it is also a good example of what can go wrong when government asks to build weaknesses into security systems.

Back in the early 1990s, it was illegal to export most products from the U.S. if they had strong cryptography. To be exportable, a system had to use small keys that could be defeated by a brute-force search over the (reduced) key space. Because of this, the secure web protocol, SSL, was designed to allow either party to a communication to ask to use a special export mode. [Note for crypto geeks: “export mode” refers to certain cipher suites whose names start with “EXP”.] When it became legal to export strong crypto, the export mode feature was not removed from the protocol because some software still depended on it. Export mode is still an option today.

This creates the possibility that a network “man in the middle” (MITM) can downgrade the security of a connection. If Alice and Bob are setting up a connection, the MITM can tell Alice that Bob is asking for export mode, and vice versa. This kind of “downgrade attack” is well known, and the TLS/SSL protocol has features designed to detect it. In this case, for complicated reasons beyond the scope of this post, the anti-downgrade protections could be evaded by a clever MITM.

Having tricked Alice and Bob into using export mode, an adversary could then crack the 512-bit RSA keys used in this mode. Back in the ‘90s that would have required a heavy-duty computation, but today it takes about 7 hours on Amazon EC2 and costs about $100.

Many web sites are vulnerable to this attack, allowing an adversary in the network to spoof or spy on traffic to vulnerable sites. About 12% of popular sites appear to be vulnerable, including americanexpress.com, groupon.com, bloomberg.com, kohls.com, marriott.com, and usajobs.gov.

Even the National Security Agency’s own site is vulnerable. That’s not a big national security problem in itself because NSA doesn’t distribute state secrets from its public site. But there is an important lesson here about the consequences of crypto policy decisions: the NSA’s actions in the ‘90s to weaken exportable cryptography boomeranged on the agency, undermining the security of its own site twenty years later.

Next time you hear a government official ask to modify a security system to protect their own access to data, ask yourself: What are the side effects? How do we know we won’t regret this later?

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A clear line between offense and defense

The New York Times, in an editorial today entitled “Arms Control for a Cyberage“, writes,

The problem is that unlike conventional weapons, with cyberweapons “there’s no clear line between offense and defense,” as President Obama noted this month in an interview with Re/code, a technology news publication. Defense in cyberwarfare consists of pre-emptively locating the enemy’s weakness, which means getting into its networks.

This is simply wrong.
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We can de-anonymize programmers from coding style. What are the implications?

In a recent post, I talked about our paper showing how to identify anonymous programmers from their coding styles. We used a combination of lexical features (e.g., variable name choices), layout features (e.g., spacing), and syntactic features (i.e., grammatical structure of source code) to represent programmers’ coding styles. The previous post focused on the overall results and techniques we used. Today I’ll talk about applications and explain how source code authorship attribution can be used in software forensics, plagiarism detection, copyright or copyleft investigations, and other domains.

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Lenovo Pays For Careless Product Decisions

The discovery last week that Lenovo laptops had been shipping with preinstalled adware that left users wide open to security exploitation triggered a lot of righteous anger in the tech community. David Auerbach at Slate wrote that Lenovo had “betrayed its customers and sold out their security”. Whenever a big company does something so monumentally foolish, it’s worth stepping back and asking how this could have happened.
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In Partial Defense of the Seahawks’ Play Calling

The conventional wisdom about last night’s Super Bowl is that the Seahawks made a game-losing mistake by running a passing play from the Patriots’ one yard line in the closing seconds. Some are calling it the worst Super Bowl play call ever.

I disagree. I won’t claim it was the right call, but I do think it was reasonable. Let me explain why.

To analyze the decision we have to put ourselves in the shoes of the Seahawks’ coaches at the time. They did not know that an opposing defender would make a spectacular interception. They knew that was possible—and needed to take it into account—but a fair analysis of the decision can’t use the hindsight knowledge we have now.

With that established, let’s make a simple model of the Seahawks’ strategic choices. They needed a touchdown to win. It was second down, so they could run three plays. The clock was running down, so let’s assume that if they run two running plays, the clock will expire before they can get a third play off; but an incomplete pass on the first or second play will stop the clock and give them time to run a third play. There are three play sequences they can use: run-run, pass-run-run, run-pass-run. (Passing more than once is bad strategy.)

Suppose that a run play with Marshawn Lynch scores 85% of the time, and gets stuffed at the line 15% of the time. If you run twice, there is a 2.25% chance you’ll get stuffed twice, so you win the game with 97.75% probability.

Suppose that passing on second down has these results: score: 50%, incomplete: 49%, interception: 1%. So if you call the pass-run-run sequence, the game outcome probabilities are: score: 97.90%, stopped short: 1.10%, interception: 1%. The odds of winning are a tiny bit better than if you just ran twice.

It’s counterintuitive that passing might be the right choice even though a running play is more likely to score. The reason it comes out this way is that you’re not passing instead of running, you’re passing because passing gets you an extra play and you can still try to run twice, absent a spectacular interception play by the opponent.

Now you can quibble with these probability estimates; and you can argue that the Seahawks might have had time to do three run plays. Change these assumptions, and the strategic calculations are different. But the argument so far should establish that the Seahawks weren’t crazy to pass.

The real kicker comes, though, when we consider the remaining option of run-pass-run. If the outcomes of a pass are still 50/49/1 on third down, then run-pass-run is a clear winner. But maybe a pass comes as less of a surprise on third down, so the outcomes of a pass might be worse. Even so, run-pass-run turns out to be the best strategy. For example, if the outcomes of a third-down pass are score: 25%, incomplete: 73%, interception: 2%, the run-pass-run strategy still scores 98.06% of the time, which is better than either of the other options.

The conclusion that run-pass-run is the best sequence is fairly robust against changes in the probability assumptions. If it’s wrong, it’s probably because of the assumption that run-run-run isn’t an option.

The Seahawks’ decision to pass on second down wasn’t crazy, but a better choice would have been to pass on third down. Announcers who said “just run twice” were giving bad advice. The Seahawks didn’t make a terrible play call; they made a reasonable choice but were defeated by a great defensive play.

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Nine awesome Bitcoin projects at Princeton

As promised, here are the final project presentations from the Bitcoin and cryptocurrency technologies class I taught at Princeton. I encouraged students to build something real, rather than toy class projects, and they delivered. I hope you’ll find these presentations interesting and educational, and that you build on the work presented here (I’ve linked to the projects on GitHub if the code is available).

If you haven’t already, you should sign up for the online version of this class we’re teaching starting in a couple of weeks. The class will prepare you to do projects just like these.

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Android WebView security and the mobile advertising marketplace

Freedom to Tinker readers are probably aware of the current controversy over Google’s handling of ongoing security vulnerabilities in its Android WebView component. What sounds at first like a routine security problem turns out to have some deep challenges.  Let’s start by filling in some background and build up to the big problem they’re not talking about: Android advertising.
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Sign up now for the Bitcoin and cryptocurrency technologies online course

At Princeton I taught a course on Bitcoin and cryptocurrency technologies during the semester that just ended. Joe Bonneau unofficially co-taught it with me. Based on student feedback and what we accomplished in the course, it was extremely successful. Next week I’ll post videos of all the final project presentations.

The course was based on a series of video lectures. We’re now offering these lectures free to the public, online, together with homeworks, programming assignments, and a textbook. We’ve heard from computer science students at various institutions as well as the Bitcoin community about the need for structured educational materials, and we’re excited to fill this need.

We’re using Piazza as our platform. Here’s the course page. To sign up, please fill out this (very short) form.

The first several book chapters are already available. The course starts February 16, and we’ll start making the videos available closer to that date (you’ll need to sign up to watch the videos Edit: we’ve changed this policy; the lectures are also publicly available). Each week there will be a Google hangout with that week’s lecturer. We’ll also answer questions on Piazza.

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