December 10, 2018

The Third Workshop on Technology and Consumer Protection

Arvind Narayanan and I are pleased to announce that the Workshop on Technology and Consumer Protection (ConPro ’19) will return for a third year! The workshop will once again be co-located with the IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy, occurring in May 2019.

ConPro is a forum for a diverse range of computer science research with consumer protection implications. Last year, papers covered topics ranging from online dating fraud to the readability of security guidance. Panelists and invited speakers explored topics from preventing caller-ID spoofing to protecting unique communities.

We see ConPro as a workshop in the classic sense, providing substantive feedback and new ideas. Presentations have sparked suggestions for follow-up work and collaboration opportunities. Attendees represent a wide range of research areas, spurring creative ideas and interesting conversation. For example, comments about crowdworker concerns this year led to discussion of best practices for research making use of those workers.

Although our community has grown, we aim to keep discussion and feedback a central part of the workshop. Our friends in the legal community have had some success with larger events focused on feedback and discussion, such as PLSC. We plan to take lessons from those cases.

The success of ConPro in past years—amazing research, attendees, discussion, and PCs—makes us excited for next year. The call for papers lists some relevant topics, but if you do computer science research with consumer protection implications, it’s relevant (but be sure those implications are clear). The submission deadline is January 23, 2019. We hope you’ll submit a paper and join us in San Francisco!

"E-Voting: Risk and Opportunity" Live Stream Tomorrow at 1:30pm Eastern

Despite the challenges due to Hurricane Sandy earlier this week, the Center for Information Technology Policy at Princeton is still hosting “E-Voting: Risk and Opportunity,” a live streamed symposium on the state and future of voting technology. At 1:30pm (Eastern) on November 1, 2012, electronic voting experts from across the United States will discuss what to expect on Election Day, how we might build a secure, convenient, high-tech voting system of the future, and what policymakers should be doing. The current U.S. e-voting system is a patchwork of locally implemented technologies and procedures — with varying degrees of reliability, usability, and security. Different groups have advocated for improved systems, better standards, and new approaches like internet-based voting. Panelists will discuss these issues and more, with a keynote by Professor Ron Rivest. You can watch the event streamed live at https://citp.princeton.edu.

Date: Thursday, November 1, 2012
Time: 1:30 PM – 5:00 PM (Eastern)
Location: streaming online at https://citp.princeton.edu
Hashtag: ask questions and add comments via Twitter at #PrincetonEvoting

Archived video now available:

Open Government Workshop at CITP

Here at Princeton’s CITP, we have a healthy interest in issues of open government and government transparency. With the release last week of the Open Government Directive by the Obama Administration, our normally gloomy winter may prove to be considerably brighter.

In addition to creating tools like Recap and FedThread, we’ve also been thinking deeply about the nature of open and transparent government, how system designers and architects can better create transparent systems and how to achieve sustainability in open government. Related to these questions are those of the law.gov effort—providing open access to primary legal materials—and how to best facilitate the tinkerers who work on projects of open government.

These are deep issues, so we thought it best to organize a workshop and gather people from a variety of perspectives to dig in.

If you’re interested, come to our workshop next month! While we didn’t consciously plan it this way, the last day of this workshop corresponds to the first 45-day deadline under the OGD.

Open Government: Defining, Designing, and Sustaining Transparency
January 21–22, 2010
http://citp.princeton.edu/open-government-workshop/

Despite increasing interest in issues of open government and governmental transparency, the values of “openness” and “transparency” have been under-theorized. This workshop will bring together academics, government, advocates and tinkerers to examine a few critical issues in open and transparent government. How can we better conceptualize openness and transparency for government? Are there specific design and architectural needs and requirements placed upon systems by openness and transparency? How can openness and transparency best be sustained? How should we change the provision and access of primary legal materials? Finally, how do we best coordinate the supply of open government projects with the demand from tinkerers?

Anil Dash, Director of the AAAS’ new Expert Labs, will deliver the keynote. We are thrilled with the diverse list of speakers, and are looking forward to a robust conversation.

The workshop is free and open to the public, although we ask that you RSVP to so that we be sure to have a name tag and lunch for you.