October 22, 2018

"E-Voting: Risk and Opportunity" Live Stream Tomorrow at 1:30pm Eastern

Despite the challenges due to Hurricane Sandy earlier this week, the Center for Information Technology Policy at Princeton is still hosting “E-Voting: Risk and Opportunity,” a live streamed symposium on the state and future of voting technology. At 1:30pm (Eastern) on November 1, 2012, electronic voting experts from across the United States will discuss what to expect on Election Day, how we might build a secure, convenient, high-tech voting system of the future, and what policymakers should be doing. The current U.S. e-voting system is a patchwork of locally implemented technologies and procedures — with varying degrees of reliability, usability, and security. Different groups have advocated for improved systems, better standards, and new approaches like internet-based voting. Panelists will discuss these issues and more, with a keynote by Professor Ron Rivest. You can watch the event streamed live at https://citp.princeton.edu.

Date: Thursday, November 1, 2012
Time: 1:30 PM – 5:00 PM (Eastern)
Location: streaming online at https://citp.princeton.edu
Hashtag: ask questions and add comments via Twitter at #PrincetonEvoting

Archived video now available:

CITP Welcomes This Year's Fellows

The 2012-2013 academic year is well underway, and the Center for Information Technology Policy is buzzing with fellows and departmental guests. Look forward to their posts here on Freedom to Tinker in the days and weeks to come, and read their full bios on the CITP site.
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Goodbye, Stanford. Hello, Princeton!

[Editor’s note: The Center for Information Technology Policy (CITP) is delighted to welcome Arvind Narayanan as an Assistant Professor in Computer Science, and an affiliated faculty member in CITP. Narayanan is a leading researcher in digital privacy, data anonymization, and technology policy. His work has been widely published, and includes a paper with CITP co-authors Ed Felten and Joseph Calandrino. In addition to his core technical research, Professor Narayanan will be engaged in active public policy topics through projects such as DoNotTrack.us, and is sought as an expert in the increasingly complex domain of privacy and technology. He was recently profiled on Wired.com as the “World’s Most Wired Computer Scientist.”]

I’ve had a wonderful first month at Princeton as an assistant professor in Computer Science and CITP. Let me take a quick moment to introduce myself.

I’m a computer scientist by training; I study information privacy and security, and in the last few years have developed a strong side-interest in tech policy. I did my Ph.D. at UT Austin and more recently I was a post-doctoral researcher at Stanford and a Junior Affiliate Fellow at the Stanford Law School Center for Internet and Society.

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