November 21, 2018

The Third Workshop on Technology and Consumer Protection

Arvind Narayanan and I are pleased to announce that the Workshop on Technology and Consumer Protection (ConPro ’19) will return for a third year! The workshop will once again be co-located with the IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy, occurring in May 2019.

ConPro is a forum for a diverse range of computer science research with consumer protection implications. Last year, papers covered topics ranging from online dating fraud to the readability of security guidance. Panelists and invited speakers explored topics from preventing caller-ID spoofing to protecting unique communities.

We see ConPro as a workshop in the classic sense, providing substantive feedback and new ideas. Presentations have sparked suggestions for follow-up work and collaboration opportunities. Attendees represent a wide range of research areas, spurring creative ideas and interesting conversation. For example, comments about crowdworker concerns this year led to discussion of best practices for research making use of those workers.

Although our community has grown, we aim to keep discussion and feedback a central part of the workshop. Our friends in the legal community have had some success with larger events focused on feedback and discussion, such as PLSC. We plan to take lessons from those cases.

The success of ConPro in past years—amazing research, attendees, discussion, and PCs—makes us excited for next year. The call for papers lists some relevant topics, but if you do computer science research with consumer protection implications, it’s relevant (but be sure those implications are clear). The submission deadline is January 23, 2019. We hope you’ll submit a paper and join us in San Francisco!

The Second Workshop on Technology and Consumer Protection

Arvind Narayanan and I are excited to announce that the Workshop on Technology and Consumer Protection (ConPro ’18) will return in May 2018, once again co-located with the IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy.

The first ConPro brought together researchers from a wide range of disciplines, united by a shared goal of promoting consumer welfare through empirical computer science research. The topics ranged from potentially misleading online transactions to emerging biomedical technologies. Discussions were consistently insightful. For example, one talk explored the observed efficacy of various technical and non-technical civil interventions against online crime. Several—including a panel with technical and policy experts—considered steps that researchers can take to make their work more usable by policymakers, such as examining and documenting the agreement between researched practices and a company’s public statements.

We think the first workshop was a success. Participants were passionate about the social impact of their own research, and just as passionate in encouraging similarly thoughtful but dramatically different work. We aim to foster and build this engaged and supportive community.

As a result, we are thrilled to be organizing a second ConPro. Our interests lie wherever computer science intersects with consumer protection, including security, e-crime, algorithmic fairness, privacy, usability, and much more. Our stellar program committee reflects this range of interests. Check out the call for papers for more information. The submission deadline is January 23, 2018, and we look forward to reading this year’s great work!

New Workshop on Technology and Consumer Protection

[Joe Calandrino is a veteran of Freedom to Tinker and CITP. As long time readers will remember,  he did his Ph.D. here, advised by Ed Felten. He recently joined the FTC as research director of OTech, the Office of Technology Research and Investigation. Today we have an exciting announcement. — Arvind Narayanan.]

Arvind Narayanan and I are thrilled to announce a new Workshop on Technology and Consumer Protection (ConPro ’17) to be co-hosted with the IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy (Oakland) in May 2017:

Advances in technology come with countless benefits for society, but these advances sometimes introduce new risks as well. Various characteristics of technology, including its increasing complexity, may present novel challenges in understanding its impact and addressing its risks. Regulatory agencies have broad jurisdiction to protect consumers against certain harmful practices (typically called “deceptive and unfair” practices in the United States), but sophisticated technical analysis may be necessary to assess practices, risks, and more. Moreover, consumer protection covers an incredibly broad range of issues, from substantiation of claims that a smartphone app provides advertised health benefits to the adequacy of practices for securing sensitive customer data.

The Workshop on Technology and Consumer Protection (ConPro ’17) will explore computer science topics with an impact on consumers. This workshop has a strong security and privacy slant, with an overall focus on ways in which computer science can prevent, detect, or address the potential for technology to deceive or unfairly harm consumers. Attendees will skew towards academic and industry researchers but will include researchers from government agencies with a consumer protection mission, including the Federal Trade Commission—the U.S. government’s primary consumer protection body. Research advances presented at the workshop may help improve the lives of consumers, and discussions at the event may help researchers understand how their work can best promote consumer welfare given laws and norms surrounding consumer protection.

We have an outstanding program committee representing an incredibly wide range of computer science disciplines—from security, privacy, and e-crime to usability and algorithmic fairness—and touching on fields across the social sciences. The workshop will be an opportunity for these different disciplinary perspectives to contribute to a shared goal. Our call for papers discusses relevant topics, and we encourage anyone conducting research in these areas to submit their work by the January 10 deadline.

Computer science research—and computer security research in particular—excels at advancing innovative technical strategies to mitigate potential negative effects of digital technologies on society, but measures beyond strictly technical fixes also exist to protect consumers. How can our research goals, methods, and tools best complement laws, regulations, and enforcement? We hope this workshop will provide an excellent opportunity for computer scientists to consider these questions and find even better ways for our field to serve society.